Looking to make more sales? Maybe it’s in the cards!

Looking to make more sales? Maybe it’s in the cards!

Written By Jeffrey Gitomer
@GITOMER

KING OF SALES, The author of thirteen best-selling books including The Sales Bible, The Little Red Book of Selling, and The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude. His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerLearningAcademy.com.

(This is a Gitomer throw-back article. The people and companies they worked for may have changed but the message is still the same.)

Hand written notes and cards are the rage. When I get one, it’s usually for something special I’ve done for someone, or an appreciation for business. I always save them. It feels good to get them, and I have a better feeling for the person who sent the card.

Business note cards leave a positive and personal impression.

Randy Rosler is a card shark (in a business kind of a way). He is trying to be the entrepreneurial card shark of all time. His company, IntroKnocks specializes in standard and custom business greeting cards. Memorable, humorous, personalized greetings. One of a kind messages that create an impression and get the desired results…a meeting that can lead to a sale.

Rosler sets himself apart from other card companies by creating humorous graphic images combined with solid real world messages that get to the point.

What can the right business card do to develop your business relationships?

  • It’s business mail that gets opened and read.
  • It sends a meaningful, thoughtful and pertinent message.
  • It creates an impression that’s positive.
  • It’s reflective of the image of the type of company you have.
  • It’s reflective of the type of service they’re likely to get.
  • Softens the person up for the next contact.
  • Makes the recipient feel special or important.
  • Gives you a better shot at the next step.
  • It’s fun. It’s fun. It’s fun.

It can change an opinion or previously existing mood or tone. (This salesperson or company may not be so bad after all or maybe I should reconsider.)

When do you send personal cards?

  • to gain interest.
  • to set yourself apart from the competition.
  • to get an appointment.
  • to confirm an appointment.
  • to thank for an order.
  • to congratulate or acknowledge a special occasion
  • to appreciate a favor.
  • to accompany something of interest or value.
  • to gain interest.

THE BIG SECRET: Don’t just thank the prospect for the meeting have a meaningful purpose. Add value and you add to the impact. Be creative. Combine the message with something that relates to the person or their business. An article, an ad specialty, or something of personal interest.

Examples of adding value and impact…

  • The note says: “Thanks for the time shared…I saw this yesterday in your trade journal, thought it might be of interest to you.” (Enclose a copy of the article.)
  • Add a gift or an ad specialty to the note:
    • The note says: thanks a mint you sent mints.
    • The note says: thanks a bunch send flowers.
    • The note says: you’re matchless…almost send personalized matches.
  • A card with a personal item proves you were listening, proves you care about the prospect personally, and it has a lasting impact to ensure that the next attempt at contact puts you at the top of the list.

Success example: What does a business card have to do with The Hair Club for Men? A Chase Manhattan banker used a “just touching bases” card to break down an initial wall of resistance (no returned phone calls, etc.) with the famous Sy Sperling (“I’m not only the president of the company I’m also a client”).

The card worked. Sperling called the banker after receiving the card because he liked the approach. They made a lunch appointment. Sperling now banks at Chase Manhattan. The banker placed a huge reorder of cards. Everyone won.

Some other cardinal notes about note cards…

  • Hand address the envelope.
  • Make sure the card fits the occasion.
  • Be certain the personality of the person and the card match.
  • Don’t overdo it, or you lose the impact.
  • Don’t make the message too mushy stick to “ways you can help.”

My conversation with Rosler turned to his goals and business philosophies for IntroKnocks. “My objective,” he said, “is to become a business resource to my customers. When they think of business development, customer communications or building relationships, I want them to think about IntroKnocks and our cards in the same thought. I don’t think of my company as people who make cards we create business development tools.”

Business Greetings!