Salespeople have questions. Jeffrey has answers.

Salespeople have questions. Jeffrey has answers.

Written By Jeffrey Gitomer
@GITOMER

KING OF SALES, The author of thirteen best-selling books including The Sales Bible, The Little Red Book of Selling, and The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude. His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerLearningAcademy.com.

Salespeople have questions. Jeffrey has answers.



I get a ton of emails asking to solve sales dilemmas. Here are a few that may relate to your job, your life, but most important, your sales thought process.



Jeffrey,

If you don’t win an account, what are the best follow-up questions you typically ask the prospect? Thanks!
Jay



Jay,
If you don’t win an account, the best follow-up you would do is to find out why you lost it. It’s obvious that someone else’s product or service was perceived as better than yours was. Or someone else’s price was lower. Your best bet is to call the last ten people who turned you down and find out why. Those answers will lead you to your next sales.

Best regards,
Jeffrey





Jeffrey,
I work in the tourism industry. I have created my own email list for two states (over 200 email addresses so far). I use the list to send out tourism articles, trends, stats and ideas I find. I figure my clients and potential clients should know what I know about the tourism industry. I want them to come to me when they have questions about my company, or member travel data. And it works! I get comments all the time about my emails, and people are asking to be included in the list. It has helped me get new clients, and renew my relationship with my current clients.
Matt



Matt,
The single most valuable asset that you, or your company, will possess over the next 50 years will be your email mailing list. Keep building it, and guard it with your life. Best regards,
Jeffrey





Jeffrey,
Our customers (like most everyone’s) constantly give us the price objection. Here’s a thought-provoking question and comment we came up with: 1. Mr. Customer, when has going with the lowest price ever been a GREAT business decision? and 2. Mr. Customer, you know, the



United States

did not become the economic superpower that it is in this world by having a 200 year history of going with the lowest price.
Dale



Dale,
These are good answers, but I don’t believe that they’ll get you the order. Once a customer gives a price pushback, it means that they don’t yet perceive enough value to go with you, OR they want to do business with you, but they want you to match the price of the competitor. Both of these are huge options to make the sale. I always hope that a customer throws “match this price” at me because it’s the easier of the two and then I know exactly where I stand. Either way, this objection must be dealt with from a “value” perspective. The customer must perceive that the value of your product is greater than the price.
Best regards,
Jeffrey





Jeffrey,
This may be an “on the other side of the coin” question. Why is it that your boss loves you when you’re negotiating with clients, but not when you’re negotiating with him about compensation? I’m usually on target, but when non-budgeted money comes in (big deals, opportunities not foreseen) my boss does not share further. I always set the commission parameters at the beginning of the year. But sometime down the road, I want to re-negotiate. What do you suggest?
Gabriel



Gabriel,
It’s seems as though both you and your boss are more interested in money than customers. If you want to be involved in the greed of selling, start out requesting 50% of all profits and go from there. The thing I’ve found with salespeople is that the greedier the salesperson, the quicker they get replaced. If you couldn’t negotiate your best commission rate at the beginning of your term — then maybe you’re not the negotiator you think you are.
Best regards,
Jeffrey





Jeffrey,
Any ideas on how I should redevelop inactive or passive accounts?
TJ



TJ,
By calling them on the phone, and telling them the truth. “Mr. Jones, I see by your file that we have been pathetically inadequate in staying in touch with you, and doing our best to maintain a business relationship that’s both beneficial and profitable to you. I am calling today to ask for an opportunity to re-earn a small portion of your business.”

Best regards,
Jeffrey



Dear Jeffrey,
Thanks for all the help you have given me over the years. I sell advertising space on the Internet. Traditionally this is a cheap way of advertising when compared to press and other mediums. I have come across an objection that has left me speechless — “You’re too cheap.” Can you please can you give me some advice on this?
Lyndsay


Lyndsay,
Raise your prices.
Best regards,
Jeffrey


Jeffrey Gitomer, author of The Little Red Book of Selling, and The Little Black Book of Connections. President of Charlotte-based Buy Gitomer, he gives seminars, runs annual sales meetings, and conducts internet training programs on selling and customer service at www.trainone.com. He can be reached at 704/333-1112 or e-mail to salesman@gitomer.com


c 2006 All Rights Reserved – Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112 www.gitomer.com